Wednesday, August 01, 2007

Maxfield Bookended & A New Project

"The Color of Winter" - 8 x 10" colored pencil on paper.
Copyright 2007 Maggie Stiefvater
Click here to bid.

All right, I know I said I was going to wrap up Maxfield Parrish's month today, but I'm afraid I've decided to leave it partially open-ended. I'll explain in a bit, but first of all, here's been the posts on good ol' Maxfield for the month:


I still am fascinated by him and his commercial success and I think that I still have more to learn from him -- I'm going to be tracking down more books on him in the months to come.

I was feeling frustrated this entire month as I like to do a piece in the style of my monthly artist, and I just couldn't figure out what do like Maxfield. Then I realized I was coming up against the same wall I had with Waterhouse. I can't do trees. Both Waterhouse and Parrish do trees for breakfast. Well, that's probably a horrible analogy, but you get what I mean. Trees are their bread and butter. They rock at landscapes.

I, uh, suck at trees. That's the polite way of putting it.

So this is what I'm doing for my Maxfield Parrish project, and it's also becoming my August Monthly Artist Project as well. I'm doing 30 days of trees. A sketch of a tree or an animal piece with trees featured prominently, once every day but Sunday for the entire month. Until I figure those buggers out. Anyone who wants to join me can blog about it and send me the links and I'll try to remember to link you in my project posts.

7 comments:

Lisa B. said...

Funny things, those trees. I used to try to trick myself into doing tree "portraits" or tree "figures." It sort of worked, but they ended up looking a lot like the animated trees from The Wizard of Oz, complete with faces.

Jo Castillo said...

Maggie, how opportunistic for me that you will be doing trees. They are the bane of my paintings lately, especially cottonwoods.

I will see if I can keep up. We will be on the road this weekend. I will let you know.

Jo

leslie said...

Go have a look at this guys stuff.
Thomas Paquette.
http://www.thomaspaquette.com/
And I was always a fan of Edmund Dulac's trees.
Looking at tree branches via photos is helpful. The darn things blow in the wind otherwise...

Anonymous said...

Wish I could join but 2 more weeks of classes. When you look at Maxfield notice he does a lot of children's stories. Might help if you thought of that for a subect. After the trees of course.

Debbie
wildlifeartist@knology.net

PS parrish.artpassions.net is the best one you listed for his paintings

Sheila said...

I knew an art professor once who instructed his students to do lots of "nude" tree drawings in the winter after the leaves have fallen. That way you get a feeling for the "skeleton" of the tree and have an idea of what really makes, say, an oak look different from a maple. Then you're ready to draw/paint them dressed! Good luck - you should love 'em or hate 'em by the end of the month...

Belinda Lindhardt said...

Maggie i have been studying trees of late. I have a few posts about trees on my blog and about to start a tree painting.. they are great. they are the first thing i ever got taught how to draw :)

visioneerwindows said...

the book ye need to get is Henry C Pitz, How to Draw Trees...... then ye'll never have problems...